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Web Design is about conversions. Not looking pretty.

I see it all too often. Design for the sake of pretty design. Now, don’t get me wrong, a site should look great – there is no question about that. But what it shouldn’t ever do is put design above your core goal.

Ask yourself this one question: What is your first KPI (Key Performance Index) for your new site? In other words, is your site there to sell your product? Your services? Will it get your more sales or leads? If not, then it isn’t doing the job right.

A common issue is that design has taken the lead role in so many web projects. “Yes, that button does look so much better there – BUT, it also lowers conversion rates by 25%.” You have to pick your design battles. I know a ton of other Freelance Web Designers in London that will focus wholly on your design without a moment’s thought for your actual business and how the website may help you get to where you want to be.

So the onus comes back onto you. Don’t allow yourself to be blinded by pretty colours and swishy designs with all sorts of bells and whistles. Ask yourself, and ask your web designer – why is that there? What does that do for my customer? Does it make their life easier? Does it help me to increase my bottom line. And that is what it is all about. Your bottom line. You’re not making a website to win a design award (although it’d be nice), you’re having a new website to increase your profits. It’s as simple as that.

A lot of this can come back to you, the client. It’s important that you fill out a proper brief. Take time to tell a designer what you want in terms of business, rather than in terms of design and that will put you in a good position. There is nothing more infuriating than when a client asks you for a site that’s Parallax (or animated, or with a pastel colour scheme, or with a full screen image, or [insert current web trend here]) – ask yourself WHY you want that. Why and how does it help your business.

Most of the time it doesn’t. Parallax is great if you’re showing off your designs. But you know what it isn’t usually good for? SMEs trying to sell in a product or raise their own profile. Design is communication, not art. Don’t confuse the two.

So, in short, what I am saying is that you should always find a designer who understands your business needs, rather than your design requirements. Once you have the business needs locked down, the design will come very naturally.

Happy Designing!